A new Luster book captures a sense of timelessness in tune with the times

 © Filip Dujardin

© Filip Dujardin

In the tiny country of Belgium, where there’s a saying that translates to Belgians having a “brick in their stomach”, it’s no surprise that even when people are not building a new home from scratch, they have a tendency to renovate – extensively.

After working on more than 70 private residences, offices and ateliers since 2005 – including her own home, the interior architect Elise Van Thuyne can be said to have built up a pretty solid expertise on the matter.

As Van Thuyne is an autodidact, the conventional tenets of design are less important to her than the light, the materials used and the execution of details. Her projects are not sterile showrooms or décors – they are layered stories, like the ones that can be found in paintings or photographs.

The core of her philosophy revolves around what can be felt, not per se what can be seen, hence the title of a book published by Luster that documents her work: The Invisible Mark.

In it, we can follow her line of work: her radical yet gentle interventions that looks for timelessness in tune with the times.

 © Filip Dujardin

© Filip Dujardin

A project that stands out is Van Thuyne’s renovation of the atelier, storage space and office of furniture design duo Muller Van Severen. She tackled the former carriage-house by adding elements that suit the artist duo’s aesthetic to a tee, such as the bright red window frames and door frames that now highlight the brick bones of the 1907 structure.

Always taking into account her commissioner’s tastes and needs, Van Thuyne manages to create a recognizable universe of multiple possibilities out of a host of details, structures and materials. A source of inspiration for anyone looking to find balance in both work and life, looking and feeling, word and image.